AP Language
AP 11 Acknowledgement of Summer Requirement

AP Lang Summer Requirement

AP Literary Data Sheet 

HELPFUL AP WEBSITES

Course Overview and Expectations
https://apstudent.collegeboard.org/apcourse/ap-english-language-and-composition

American Rhetoric
http://www.americanrhetoric.com/

Blue Eagle Commentary
http://blueagle.com/

Virtual Salt: A Handbook for Rhetorical Devices
http://virtualsalt.com/rhetoric

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Units of study for each nine week grading period:

Unit 1: Rhetorical Analysis

Reading Focus

  • Students will read a variety of texts to foster a clear understanding of rhetorical analysis. Fiction pieces to be considered in this unit include but are not limited to The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald, Into the Wild by Jon Krakauer, “A Pair of Silk Stockings” by Kate Chopin, “The Wagner Matinee” by Willa Cather, “Soldier’s Home” by Ernest Hemingway, and “A Rose for Emily” by William Faulkner.  Nonfiction pieces to be considered in this unit include but are not limited to Walden by Henry David Thoreau, In Search of Our Mothers’ Gardens by Alice Walker, “The Joy of Reading and Writing: Superman and Me” by Sherman Alexie, “Graduation” by Maya Angelou, “On Comparison” by Barbara Lazear, “Lost in the Kitchen” by Dave Barry, “Shooting an Elephant” by George Orwell, “Once More to the Lake” by E. B. White, “Shooting Dad” by Sarah Vowell, “On Keeping a Notebook” by Joan Didion, “Learning to Read” by Malcolm X, and “I Just Wanna Be Average” by Mike Rose.  [Curricular Requirement 5]
  • For each reading assignment, students will participate in various whole-class activities including discussion, debate, and critical analysis.  Individually, students will respond to readings through written analysis of rhetorical strategies and argument concerning authorial intent and purpose.  [Curricular Requirement 4; Curricular Requirement 5]

  Writing Focus

  • Students will begin with an introduction to the rhetorical web and its components including exigence, audience, purpose, ethos, logos, pathos, organization, structure, and form.  Through close reading and analysis, students will learn to connect rhetorical techniques with an author’s purpose and the meaning of a work.  Rhetorical analysis focuses on explaining how an author’s syntax, diction, imagery, and figurative language work together to affect a reader.  Students will also focus on creating strong responses to literature using embedded quotes and analysis. [Curricular Requirement 1; Curricular Requirement 4]
  • With each writing assignment, students use peer revision techniques in groups and pairs.  Likewise, students conference with me concerning each essay.  All writing assignments go through the revision process before final grading. [Curricular Requirement 2; Curricular Requirement 9]

 Syntax Focus

  • Students will learn appropriate vocabulary for rhetorical analysis and will learn to effectively use this vocabulary to analyze a passage of literature.  I provide direct instruction in sentence structure, organization, coherence, detail, and rhetoric.  [Curricular Requirement 9]

Visual Focus

  • Students will learn to analyze the rhetorical strategies inherent in visual media including cartoons, photographs, paintings, sculptures, films, and comic strips during this unit.  [Curricular Requirement 6]
  • Students will complete journal entries analyzing these rhetorical strategies in visual media. [Curricular Requirement 3]

Unit 2: Argumentation

Reading Focus

  • Students will read a variety of texts to foster a clear understanding of argumentation.  Fiction pieces to be considered include but are not limited to Of Mice and Men by John Steinbeck and The Crucible by Arthur Miller.  Nonfiction pieces to be considered include but are not limited to In Search of Our Mothers’ Gardens by Alice Walker, Walden by Henry David Thoreau, “Men, Women, Sex, and Darwin” by Natalie Angier, “Serving in Florida” by Barbara Ehrenreich, “The Ways We Lie” by Stephanie Ericsson, “Women’s Brains” by Stephen Jay Gould, “What’s Wrong with Animal Rights?” by Vicki Hearne, The Declaration of Independence by Thomas Jefferson, “Letter from Birmingham Jail” by Martin Luther King, Jr., “Never Just Pictures” by Susan Bordo, “Why Don’t We Complain” by William F. Buckley, Jr.,  “Television: the Plug-In Drug” by Marie Winn, “Crito” by Plato, and “Animal Liberation” by Peter Singer.  [Curriculum Requirement 5]
  • For each reading assignment, students will participate in various whole-class activities including discussion, debate, and critical analysis.  Individually, students will respond to readings through written analysis of rhetorical strategies and argument concerning authorial intent and purpose.  [Curricular Requirement 4; Curricular Requirement 5]

 Writing Focus

  • Students will begin by focusing on the argumentative properties inherent in advertisements and cartoons.  To develop argumentative skills, students will learn to deconstruct an argumentative writing prompt and then defend, challenge, or qualify a position.  Students will also learn to use specific evidence to support a position.  This evidence could be derived from literature, current events, history, personal experience, social observations, or pop culture.  [Curricular Requirement 1; Curricular Requirement 4]
  • With each writing assignment, students use peer revision techniques in groups and pairs.  Likewise, students conference with me concerning each essay.  All writing assignments go through the revision process before final grading. [Curricular Requirement 2; Curricular Requirement 9]

 Syntax Focus

  • Students will learn appropriate vocabulary for argumentation and will learn to effectively use this vocabulary to analyze a passage of literature.  I provide direct instruction in sentence structure, organization, coherence, detail, and rhetoric.  [Curricular Requirement 9]

 Visual Focus

  • Students will learn to analyze the argumentative strategies inherent in visual media including cartoons, photographs, paintings, sculptures, films, and comic strips during this unit.
  • Students will complete journal entries analyzing these analytical strategies in visual media. 
  • Students will write an argument essay that draws upon personal recollections related to a personal photo and reaches beyond the personal to establish a universal argument about the power of photos.  [Curricular Requirement 6]

Unit 3: Synthesis

 Reading Focus

  • Students will read a variety of texts to foster an understanding of synthesis writing.  Nonfiction pieces to be considered include but are not limited to “Graduation” by Maya Angelou, “Notes on a Native Son” by James Baldwin, “The Myth of the Latin Woman: I Just Met a Girl Named Maria” by Judith Ortiz Cofer, “How It Feels to Be Colored Me” by Zora Neale Hurston, In Search of Our Mothers’ Gardens by Alice Walker, “Notes of a Native Speaker” by Eric Liu, “Two Ways to Belong in America” by Bharati Mukherjee, “How to Tame a Wild Tongue” by Gloria Anzaldua, “Aria: Memoir of a Bilingual Childhood” by Richard Rodriguez, “Mother Tongue” by Amy Tan, “Death of a Moth” by Annie Dillard, and “The Death of the Moth” by Virginia Woolfe.  [Curriculum Requirement 5]
  • For each reading assignment, students will participate in various whole-class activities including discussion, debate, and critical analysis.  Individually, students will respond to readings through written analysis of rhetorical strategies and argument concerning authorial intent and purpose.  [Curricular Requirement 4; Curricular Requirement 5]

  Writing Focus

  • Students will learn to deconstruct a synthesis prompt, consider the issue at hand, respond to various sources, and organize and write a position-driven essay during the course of this unit.  In constructing an effective synthesis, students will learn to attribute both direct and indirect citations from sources appropriately according to MLA (Modern Language Association) guidelines.  [Curricular Requirement 7; Curricular Requirement 8]
  • With each writing assignment, students use peer revision techniques in groups and pairs.  Likewise, students conference with me concerning each essay.  All writing assignments go through the revision process before final grading. [Curricular Requirement 2; Curricular Requirement 9]

 Syntax Focus

  • Students will learn appropriate vocabulary for synthesis writing and will learn to effectively use this vocabulary to analyze a passage of literature.  I provide direct instruction in sentence structure, organization, coherence, detail, and rhetoric.  [Curricular Requirement 9]

Visual Focus

  • Students will learn to analyze and synthesize the rhetorical strategies inherent in visual media including cartoons, photographs, paintings, sculptures, films, and comic strips during this unit.  Students will also learn to examine the argumentative position from the visual media above to better synthesize an effective explanation of sources in relation to one another.  [Curricular Requirement 6]
  • Students will complete journal entries synthesizing multiple visual media into one argument.  [Curricular Requirement 2]
  • Students will write a synthesis essay developing a position on the impact of photographs on our experience of the world.  Students will use various sources found in Chapter 3 of English Language and Composition Analysis, Argument, and Synthesis as well as two other sources found on their own to construct this synthesis essay.  [Curricular Requirement 7; Curricular Requirement 8]
  • Students will transform their synthesis essay on the impact of photographs into a research-based speech, and students will present these speeches to the class.  [Curricular Requirement 6]

Unit 4: “The Final Four”

Reading Focus

  • Students will read passages from a variety of nonfiction sources taken from past AP Exams and AP Test Preparation Workbooks.  [Curriculum Requirement 5]
  • For each reading assignment, students will participate in various whole-class activities including discussion, debate, and critical analysis.  Individually, students will respond to readings through written analysis of rhetorical strategies and argument concerning authorial intent and purpose.  [Curricular Requirement 4; Curricular Requirement 5]

 Writing Focus

  • Students will write timed essays in each of modes represented on the AP English Language and Composition Exam.  These modes include rhetorical analysis, argument, and synthesis.  [Curricular Requirement 1]

 Syntax Focus

  • Students will use vocabulary for rhetorical analysis, argument, and synthesis writing in timed writing assignments.  Students will recognize and analyze rhetorical strategies and argumentative strategies in various texts on practice Multiple Choice test items.  I provide direct instruction in sentence structure, organization, coherence, detail, and rhetoric.  [Curricular Requirement 9]

Visual Focus

  • Students will analyze and synthesize visual texts as appropriate in timed writings taken from sample and past AP English Language and Composition Exams.  [Curricular Requirement 6]

AP Language and Composition Exam Preparation: Multiple Choice
Every two weeks, students will complete a practice test representing the AP Language and Composition Exam: Multiple Choice section.  These practice tests come from several sources: Cracking the AP English Language and Composition Exam 2009 Edition; 5 Steps to a 5: AP English Language2010-1; English Language and Composition Analysis, Argument, and Synthesis by Brassil, Coker, and Glover.  Students take all or part of a practice test, review their scores, and review strategies to alleviate deficiencies.  [Curricular Requirement 5; Curricular Requirement 9]

Every week, students will turn in ten (10) rhetorical device examples using AP and SAT vocabulary words provided by the teacher. [Curricular Requirement 9]

VIII. AP Language and Composition Exam Preparation: Free Response
Within each unit, students will complete timed writings structured exactly like items on the AP English Language and Composition Exam.  Students will begin each unit working in groups and/or pairs structuring essays and then move on to individual writing assignments.  Each writing assignment will be debriefed upon completion and revised for content and structure.  For debriefing, students will work in groups and/or pairs using peer response to recognize common flaws and enhance understanding.  [Curricular Requirement 1; Curricular Requirement 2, Curricular Requirement 3; Curricular Requirement 4; Curricular Requirement 5; Curricular Requirement 6; Curricular Requirement 7; Curricular Requirement 8]

Unit 4 is designed to specifically target exam preparation.  The four weeks prior to the AP English Language and Composition Exam will be spent in class writing essays, debriefing essays, taking multiple choice tests, and debriefing multiple choice tests.  This unit is an intense last effort to hone skills necessary for the AP Exam.  [Curricular Requirement 1; Curricular Requirement 2, Curricular Requirement 3; Curricular Requirement 4; Curricular Requirement 5; Curricular Requirement 6; Curricular Requirement 7; Curricular Requirement 8]