English 12
For a PDF of the following syllabus, click here: English 12 Syllabus.pdf

English 12:  British Literature

Rachael Couch, Room 228


Course Overview:

This course focuses on the study of British literature. Students will study many varieties and genres of literature including, but not limited to, drama, prose, and poetry. Composition will be present throughout the course, and will involve both long and short pieces of writing, which will assist students in critical thinking skills and analytical writing, which will prepare them for college and/or career. Grammar, mechanics, and usage will be covered throughout the year and will be measurable content on the end of course test for 12th grade.


Rules/expectations/cell phone policy:

PHONES, TABLETS, AND/OR SMART WATCHES ARE NOT ALLOWED IN CLASS. THEY MUST BE TURNED OFF AND PUT AWAY UPON ENTERING THE CLASSROOM. (If students are using devices, it will be confiscated by the teacher. First offense: students may collect them at the end of the period. Second offense:  students may collect them at the end of the day. Third offense: students must go to Mr. Edwards in the office to collect their items.)

  • Students are expected to arrive on time every day to class, prepared to work.
  • Students will be assigned a textbook and will need to bring it to class every day.

  • Students will be assessed in a variety of ways throughout the course, including both open and closed book tests; open notes tests; composition; and online assessments that correlate with the course.  (It is difficult to perform well on any of these items if students are frequently absent.)

Passes out of class:

Because of an added class change, and because of the rise in unacceptable behavior in the restrooms and other areas of the school during class instruction time, students will be allowed to leave the room only three times per grading period. This includes using the restroom. 


If students find they need to leave the room any additional time(s) after their third time during the grading period, students will be assigned Friday break detention each time they go over their three passes.  Students who fail to show up for Friday break detention will be reported to Mr. Edwards and will face disciplinary action.


All rules set forth in the Etowah County Schools Code of Conduct and the Southside High School Handbook will be followed.


Brief Course Outline (subject to change):

UNIT ONE:  The Anglo-Saxon Period and Middle Ages

ANCHOR TEXTS

Beowulf (PH SE pp.40-64)

The Canterbury Tales (PH SE pp.96-119)

RELATED TEXTS

Literary Texts (Fiction)

Poetry “The Wanderer,” translated by Charles W. Kennedy

(PH SE pp.27-29)

Ballads - choose two to complete


UNIT TWO: The Renaissance, including The Tragedy of Macbeth

ANCHOR TEXT

The Tragedy of Macbeth (PH SE pp.322-396)

RELATED TEXTS

Literary Texts (Fiction)

Poetry

Selections from each of the following poets (one each): Spenser, Sidney, Marlowe, Raleigh, and Shakespeare (PH SE pp.251-279)

Informational Texts (Non-fiction)

• (Marlowe) “Marlowe’s Poetically Odd Life, Presented in Context” by George Garrett

• (Raleigh) “Sir Walter Raleigh (1552-1618) Page” by Anniina Jokinen

• (Raleigh) “Sir Walter Raleigh” by The Reformation Society


UNIT THREE: The 17th and 18th Centuries

ANCHOR TEXT

“A Modest Proposal” (PH SE pp.618-625)

RELATED TEXTS

Literary Texts (Fiction)

Poetry

Select one work from each of the following poets: Donne, Jonson, Marvell, Herrick, and Milton (PH SE pp.479-565)

Informational Texts (Non-fiction)

• “Reading Strategy” activity (PH SE p.568).

• A Dictionary of the English Language and from The Life of Samuel Johnson (PH SE pp.646-661)

• “Modern Satire Loses Its Bite” by Nicholas Swisher

• “From the Restoration to the Death of Pope 1660-1774” by Henry Augustin Beers

• “Introductory Lecture on the Neoclassical Period in English Literature” by Jo Coster


UNIT FOUR: The Romantic Period

ANCHOR TEXT

“The Rime of the Ancient Mariner” (pp. 821-845)

RELATED TEXTS

Literary Texts (Fiction)

Poetry

“Select one work from each of the following poets: Burns, Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, P. Shelley, and Keats (PH SE pp.734-892)

Informational Texts (Non-fiction)

• “Analyzing Functional and Expository Texts” exercise (PH SE p.1022).

• (Blake) “ART REVIEW: The William Blake Who Knew Exactly Where to Draw the Line” by Suzanne Muchnic

• (Blake) “William Blake and Me” by Phillip Pullman

• (Wordsworth) “Wesley Snipes Vs. William Wordsworth: War and Peace in Words and Pictures” by Julia Keller

• (Wordsworth, Coleridge) “For Wordsworth, Coleridge, Times Were a-Changin’ Too” by Jonathon Kirsch


UNIT FIVE: The Victorian Period

ANCHOR TEXT

Frankenstein

RELATED TEXTS

Literary Texts (Fiction)

Poetry

Select one work from each of the following authors: Tennyson, R. Browning, E. Browning, Arnold, Hardy, Hopkins, and Housman (PH SE pp. 960-1093)

Informational Texts (Non-fiction)

• (Barrett Browning) “Elizabeth Barrett Browning: Social and Political Issues” by Simon Avery

• (Wilde) “Oscar Wilde Biography” biography.com

• (Wilde) “Deceptive Picture: How Oscar Wilde Painted over Dorian Gray” by Alex Ross

• “Introduction to Victorian and Twentieth Century Literature” by Heesok Chang


UNIT SIX: The Modern and Postmodern Periods

ANCHOR TEXT

1984

RELATED TEXTS

Literary Texts (Fiction)

Poetry

Select one work from each of the following authors: Yeats, Eliot, Lawrence, and Thomas (PH SE pp.1140-1390)

Informational Texts (Non-fiction)

• “Modern and Postmodern, the Bickering Twins” by Edward Rothstein

• “How First World War Poetry Painted a Truer Picture” by Anthony Richards

• “World War I Trench Poetry Remembered in Comics Anthology” by Brian Truitt

• (Eliot) “When T.S. Eliot Invented the Hipster” by Karen Swallow Prior

• “George Orwell, James Joyce and Short Fiction's Place in the World of Literature” by D. J. Taylor


**This course outline is tentative and could change.