AP Literature & Composition

For a PDF of the AP Literature and Composition syllabus, please click HERE

AP English Literature and Composition Syllabus

  1. Course Overview

The AP English Literature and Composition course focuses on the interpretation and analysis of imaginative texts from British and American literature.  Through close reading and interpretation of various texts, students will explore nuances of organization, structure, style, diction, syntax, imagery, and figurative language as these topics apply to the writing process.  In accordance with the AP English Literature and Composition Course Description, students in this course will write to “focus on the critical analysis of literature and include expository, analytical and argumentative essays” to discover the purpose and function of language within a text.  Students will consider the literary and rhetorical strategies inherent in poetry, drama, fiction, and expository prose.  To fully develop mature writing skills, students will write to synthesize material from multiple sources.  In addition, students will conduct research and complete several small research projects along with one large research-based argumentative speech following guidelines set forth by the Modern Language Association (MLA).

  1. Student Texts and Supplemental Resources

I recommend that each student purchase the texts below; however, copies of all texts included in this list are available for checkout from the Southside High School English Department and the Southside High School Library.

  • Textbook / Anthology / Workbooks

  • Hamilton, Sharon, ed.  Essential Literary Terms with Exercises.  New York: W.W. Norton & Company, 2007.

  • Elements of Literature, Sixth Course: Essentials of British and World Literature. Austin: Holt, Rhinehart, and Winston, 2008.

  • Rankin, Estelle and Barbara L. Murphy.   5 Steps to a 5: AP English Literature 2012-2013.  New York: McGraw Hill, 2011.

  • Tanzer, Donna and Martin Beller, eds.  Interpreting Poetry: Classic and Contemporary Poems.  Saddle Brook, NJ: Peoples Education, Inc., 2010.

  • Vogel, Richard, ed.  Multiple-Choice and Free-Response Questions in Preparation for the AP English Literature and Composition Examination seventh edition.  Brooklyn, NY: D&S Marketing Systems, Inc., 2006.  


  • Fiction / Drama

  • Bronte, Charlotte.  Jane Eyre.  New York: Bantam Books, 1987.

  • Gardner, John.  Grendel.  New York: Random House, Inc., 1971.

  • Shakespeare, William.  The Tragedy of Hamlet.  New York: Glencoe McGraw-Hill, 2000.

  • Shakespeare, William.  The Tragedy of Macbeth.  New York: Glencoe McGraw-Hill, 2000.

  • Shelley, Mary. Frankenstein: or the Modern Prometheus.  Austin: Holt, Rinehart, and Winston, 2008.

  • Sophocles. Oedipus the King.  New York: Washington Square Press, 1959.

  • Heart of Darkness.

  • The Sound and the Fury.

  • Personal Vocabulary Lists (provided by instructor)

  • Students are directed to bookmark the following online sources:

  • American Rhetoric (web site) <americanrhetoric.com>

  • apcentral.collegeboard.com

  • Blue Eagle Commentary (web site) <blueagle.com>

  • ClevNotes (class blog) <www.ecboe.org/sshs>

  • Edmodo (web site / social media) <edmodo.com>

  • Purdue Online Writing Lab (web site) <owl.english.purdue.edu>

  • Silva Rhetoricae: The Forest of Rhetoric (web site) <humanities.byu.edu/rhetoric>

  • Virtual Salt: A Handbook for Rhetorical Devices (web site) <virtualsalt.com/rhetoric>

  1. Teacher Resources

  • Crusius, Timothy W. and Carolyn E. Channell, eds.  The Aims of Argument: A Text and Reader.  Boston: McGraw Hill, 2009.

  • Delbanco, Nicholas and Alan Cheuse, eds.  Literature: Craft and Voice. Vol. 1.  New York: McGraw-Hill, 2010.

  • ---.  Literature: Craft and Voice. Vol. 2.  New York: McGraw-Hill, 2010.

  • ---.  Literature: Craft and Voice. Vol. 3.  New York: McGraw-Hill, 2010.

  • Jago, Carol et al, eds.  Literature and Composition: Reading, Writing, Thinking.  Boston: Bedford/St. Martin’s, 2011.

  • Kenedy, X.J. and Dana Gioia, ed.  Literature: An Introduction to Fiction, Poetry, Drama, and Writing 5th Compact Edition.  New York: Pearson Longman, 2009.

  • Kirszner, Laurie G. and Stephen R. Mandell, ed.  Patterns for College Writing: A Rhetorical Reader and Guide.  Boston: Bedford/St. Martin’s, 2010.

  • Lunsford, Andrea A., John J. Ruszkiewicz, and Keith Walters, eds.  Everything’s an Argument.  Boston: Bedford/St. Martin’s, 2010.

  • Lunsford, Andrea. A., ed.  Easy Writer.  Boston: Bedford/St. Martins, 2010.

  • Meyer, Michael, ed. The Bedford Introduction to Literature: Reading, Thinking, Writing Ninth Edition.  Boston: Bedford/St. Martin’s, 2011.

  • Rankin, Estelle and Barbara L. Murphy.   5 Steps to a 5: AP English Literature 2012-2013.  New York: McGraw Hill, 2011.

  • Soto, Michael, ed.  The Modernist Nation: Generation, Renaissance, and Twentieth-Century American Literature.  Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press, 2004.

  1. Course Organization

The Course is divided into four nine week grading periods focusing.  The first three grading periods, while considering skills of close reading, will focus on specific writing strategies – poetry analysis, prose analysis, and the open-ended analysis of a large work or large works.  These writing strategies comprise the backbone of instructional units structured to reinforce critical reading and writing skills.  The final grading period covers a unit titled “The Final Four” which emphasizes practice leading up to the AP English Literature and Composition Exam.   The primary literary focus of the course is British literature; however, various works from American literature and world literature are included to foster a well-rounded familiarity with differing writing styles that students might encounter on the AP English Literature and Composition Exam.  

  1. Assessments

  • An accumulated point system is used to determine student grades.  Point values for assignments are based upon the complexity and importance of the activity.  At the end of each nine weeks, the student’s nine week grade is determined by dividing the student’s accumulated points by the total points possible for the grading period.

  • Students will encounter all of the following types of assignments during the course:

    • Individual writing assignments

      • Essays

      • Drafts

    • Group writing assignments

    • Multiple choice tests

    • Poetry analysis quizzes

    • Prose analysis quizzes

    • Vocabulary quizzes

    • Timed writings

    • Research projects

      • Essays

      • Speeches

  1. Syllabus

  • Unit 1: Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte

    • Reading Focus

      • Students will perform close readings of the novel analyzing literary elements including archetypes, character, diction, imagery, mood, plot, allusion, and syntax.  [Curriculum Requirement Scoring Component 1]

      • During the unit, students will participate in various whole-class activities including journaling, discussion, debate, and critical analysis.  Individually, students will respond to readings through written analysis of literary strategies and argument concerning authorial intent and purpose.  [Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 2; Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 7; Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 9]

    • Writing Focus

      • Students will begin with an introduction to the novel.  Through close reading and analysis, students will learn to connect literary techniques with an author’s purpose and the meaning of a work.  Literary prose analysis focuses on explaining how an author’s syntax, diction, imagery, tone, structure, style, theme, and figurative language work together to affect a reader.  Students will also focus on creating strong responses to literature using embedded quotes and analysis in a timed-writing situation. [Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 2; Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 3; Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 5; Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 11; Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 12; Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 13; Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 14; Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 15]

      • Students will compose an original out-of-class essay that is an interpretation of the figurative language used in Jane Eyre.  This essay will be based on a careful observation of textual details within the novel. [Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 2]

      • After completing a first draft of an interpretation of the figurative language in Jane Eyre, students will use peer revision techniques in groups and pairs.  Likewise, students will conference with me concerning this essay. We will discuss the student’s use of sentence structure, rhetorical structure, balance, detail, tone, and voice. Because this is an out-of-class essay, students will revise and workshop this essay before final grading. [Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 6; Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 12; Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 13; Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 14; Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 15]

    • Syntax Focus

      • Students will learn appropriate vocabulary for literary analysis and will learn to effectively use this vocabulary to analyze a passage of literature.  I provide direct instruction in sentence structure, organization, coherence, detail, and rhetoric. [Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 11]

  • Unit 2: The Epic Hero and Existentialism

    • Reading Focus

      • Students will read Grendel and from Beowulf to foster a clear understanding of heroes and their journey.  [Curriculum Requirement Scoring Component 1]

      • For each reading assignment, students will participate in various whole-class activities including discussion, debate, and critical analysis.  Individually, students will respond to readings through written analysis of rhetorical strategies and argument concerning authorial intent and purpose.  [Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 2; Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 7; Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 9]

    • Writing Focus

      • Students will begin with an introduction to the novel.  Through close reading and analysis, students will learn to connect literary techniques with an author’s purpose and the meaning of a work.  Literary prose analysis focuses on explaining how an author’s syntax, diction, imagery, tone, structure, style, theme, and figurative language work together to affect a reader.  Students will also focus on creating strong responses to literature using embedded quotes and analysis in a timed-writing situation. [Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 2; Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 3; Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 5; Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 10; Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 11; Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 12; Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 13; Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 14; Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 15]

      • Students will compose an original out-of-class essay that is an interpretation of the style and structure of Grendel. Students will explore the elements of existentialism as they are presented in the novel, and students will analyze the stylistic elements that support the existential views of the novel.  This essay will be based on a careful observation of textual details within the novel. [Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 3]

      • After completing a first draft of an interpretation of the style and structure of Grendel, students will use peer revision techniques in groups and pairs.  Likewise, students will conference with me concerning this essay.  We will discuss the student’s use of sentence structure, rhetorical structure, balance, detail, tone, and voice.Because this is an out-of-class essay, students will revise and workshop this essay before final grading. [Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 6; Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 12; Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 13; Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 14; Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 15]

    • Syntax Focus

      • Students will learn appropriate vocabulary for argumentation and will learn to effectively use this vocabulary to analyze a passage of literature.  I provide direct instruction in sentence structure, organization, coherence, detail, and rhetoric.  [Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 11]

  • Unit 3: Characterization

    • Reading Focus

      • Students will read a variety of texts from and about The Canterbury Tales.  [Curriculum Requirement Scoring Component 1]

      • For each reading assignment, students will participate in various whole-class activities including discussion, debate, and critical analysis.  Individually, students will respond to readings through written analysis of rhetorical strategies and argument concerning authorial intent and purpose.  [Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 2; Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 7; Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 9]

    • Writing Focus

      • Students will begin with an introduction to the novel.  Through close reading and analysis, students will learn to connect literary techniques with an author’s purpose and the meaning of a work.  Literary prose analysis focuses on explaining how an author’s syntax, diction, imagery, tone, structure, style, theme, and figurative language work together to affect a reader.  Students will also focus on creating strong responses to literature using embedded quotes and analysis in a timed-writing situation. [Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 2; Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 3; Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 5; Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 11; Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 12; Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 13; Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 14; Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 15]

      • Students will write an original out-of-class essay that contrasts the attitudes toward greed demonstrated by two characters within The Canterbury Tales. This essay should focus on the social, cultural, and/or historical values represented by each character, and the interpretation should be based on a careful observation of textual details. [Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 4]

      • After completing a first draft of the essay contrasting characters’ attitudes toward greed in The Canterbury Tales, students will use peer revision techniques in groups and pairs.  Likewise, students will conference with me concerning this essay.  We will discuss the student’s use of sentence structure, rhetorical structure, balance, detail, tone, and voice. Because this is an out-of-class essay, students will revise and workshop this essay before final grading. [Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 6; Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 12; Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 13; Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 14; Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 15]

    • Syntax Focus

      • Students will learn appropriate vocabulary for synthesis writing and will learn to effectively use this vocabulary to analyze a passage of literature.  I provide direct instruction in sentence structure, organization, coherence, detail, and rhetoric. [Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 11]

  • Unit 4: Frankenstein

    • Reading Focus

      • Students will read a variety of texts from and about Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein.  [Curriculum Requirement Scoring Component 1]

      • For each reading assignment, students will participate in various whole-class activities including discussion, debate, and critical analysis.  Individually, students will respond to readings through written analysis of rhetorical strategies and argument concerning authorial intent and purpose.  [Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 2; Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 7; Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 9]

    • Writing Focus

      • Students will begin with an introduction to the novel.  Through close reading and analysis, students will learn to connect literary techniques with an author’s purpose and the meaning of a work.  Literary prose analysis focuses on explaining how an author’s syntax, diction, imagery, tone, structure, style, theme, and figurative language work together to affect a reader.  Students will also focus on creating strong responses to literature using embedded quotes and analysis in a timed-writing situation. [Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 2; Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 3; Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 5; Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 11; Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 12; Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 13; Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 14; Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 15]

      • Students will write an analytical essay in which they analyze how a key passage from Shelley’s Frankenstein highlights the novel’s central theme.  This essay will be a timed writing; however, once the essay has been graded the first time, it will be returned for debriefing and revision. [Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 8]

      • After debriefing this Frankenstein analysis essay, students will use peer revision techniques in groups and pairs.  Likewise, students will conference with me concerning this essay. We will discuss the student’s use of sentence structure, rhetorical structure, balance, detail, tone, and voice. All writing assignments go through the revision process before final grading. [Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 6; Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 12; Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 13; Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 14; Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 15]

    • Syntax Focus

      • Students will learn appropriate vocabulary for synthesis writing and will learn to effectively use this vocabulary to analyze a passage of literature.  I provide direct instruction in sentence structure, organization, coherence, detail, and rhetoric. [Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 11]

  • Unit 5: Poetry

    • Reading Focus

      • Students will read a variety of poems from British and American literature.  Poetry forms discussed include elegy, sonnet, pastoral, ballad, ode, and dramatic monologue.  Poets include Shakespeare, Marlowe, Raleigh, Herrick, Marvell, Wyatt, Spenser, Donne, Pope, Blake, Keats, and Collins.  [Curriculum Requirement Scoring Component 1]

      • For each reading assignment, students will participate in various whole-class activities including discussion, debate, and critical analysis.  Individually, students will respond to readings through written analysis of rhetorical strategies and argument concerning authorial intent and purpose.  [Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 2; Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 7; Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 9]

    • Writing Focus

      • Students will begin with an introduction to the novel.  Through close reading and analysis, students will learn to connect literary techniques with an author’s purpose and the meaning of a work.  Literary prose analysis focuses on explaining how an author’s syntax, diction, imagery, tone, structure, style, theme, and figurative language work together to affect a reader.  Students will also focus on creating strong responses to literature using embedded quotes and analysis in a timed-writing situation. [Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 2; Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 3; Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 4; Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 5; Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 11; Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 12; Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 13; Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 14; Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 15]

      • Students will write an essay analyzing the metaphysical conceits within John Donne’s “A Valediction Forbidding Mourning.” Students must explain how these conceits work together to advance the theme of the poem.  Students must evaluate the effectiveness of these conceits on the poem’s artistry and quality. [Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 9]

      • After this writing assignment, students will use peer revision techniques in groups and pairs.  Likewise, students will conference with me concerning this essay. We will discuss the student’s use of sentence structure, rhetorical structure, balance, detail, tone, and voice. All writing assignments go through the revision process before final grading. [Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 6; Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 12; Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 13; Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 14; Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 15]

    • Syntax Focus

      • Students will learn appropriate vocabulary for literary analysis writing and will learn to effectively use this vocabulary to analyze a passage of literature.  I provide direct instruction in sentence structure, organization, coherence, detail, and rhetoric. [Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 11]

  • Unit 6: Shakespeare – Macbeth and Hamlet

    • Reading Focus

      • Students will read The Tragedy of Macbeth and The Tragedy of Hamlet, Prince of Denmark.  [Curriculum Requirement Scoring Component 1]

      • For each reading assignment, students will participate in various whole-class activities including discussion, debate, and critical analysis.  Individually, students will respond to readings through written analysis of rhetorical strategies and argument concerning authorial intent and purpose.  [Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 2; Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 7; Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 9]

    • Writing Focus

      • Students will begin with an introduction to the novel.  Through close reading and analysis, students will learn to connect literary techniques with an author’s purpose and the meaning of a work.  Literary prose analysis focuses on explaining how an author’s syntax, diction, imagery, tone, structure, style, theme, and figurative language work together to affect a reader.  Students will also focus on creating strong responses to literature using embedded quotes and analysis in a timed-writing situation. [Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 2; Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 3; Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 4; Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 5; Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 8; Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 11; Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 12; Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 13; Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 14; Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 15]

      • Students will research Shakespeare’s treatment of female characters within his plays.  Students will draw upon textual evidence from either Macbeth or Hamlet to formulate an argument exploring social and/or historical values present in Shakespeare’s treatment of female roles within his plays. [Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 10]

      • During the process of this writing assignment, students will use peer revision techniques in groups and pairs.  Likewise, students will conference with me concerning each essay. We will discuss the student’s use of sentence structure, rhetorical structure, balance, detail, tone, and voice. All writing assignments go through the revision process before final grading. [Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 6; Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 12; Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 13; Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 14; Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 15]

    • Syntax Focus

      • Students will learn appropriate vocabulary for literary analysis writing and will learn to effectively use this vocabulary to analyze a passage of literature.  I provide direct instruction in sentence structure, organization, coherence, detail, and rhetoric. [Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 11]

  • Unit 7: Shakespeare and Existentialism

    • Reading Focus

      • Students will read Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead.  [Curriculum Requirement Scoring Component 1]

      • For each reading assignment, students will participate in various whole-class activities including discussion, debate, and critical analysis.  Individually, students will respond to readings through written analysis of rhetorical strategies and argument concerning authorial intent and purpose.  [Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 2; Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 7; Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 9]

    • Writing Focus

      • Students will begin with an introduction to the novel.  Through close reading and analysis, students will learn to connect literary techniques with an author’s purpose and the meaning of a work.  Literary prose analysis focuses on explaining how an author’s syntax, diction, imagery, tone, structure, style, theme, and figurative language work together to affect a reader.  Students will also focus on creating strong responses to literature using embedded quotes and analysis in a timed-writing situation. [Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 2; Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 3; Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 5; Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 11; Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 12; Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 13; Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 14; Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 15]

      • Students will write an in-class timed writing that is based on a careful observation of textual details and considers how the existential ideas present within Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead create and mold the play’s themes. [Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 3]

      • After the first scoring of this writing assignment, students will debrief this essay and use peer revision techniques in groups and pairs.  Likewise, students will conference with me concerning each essay. We will discuss the student’s use of sentence structure, rhetorical structure, balance, detail, tone, and voice. All writing assignments go through the revision process before final grading. [Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 6; Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 12; Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 13; Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 14; Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 15]

    • Syntax Focus

      • Students will learn appropriate vocabulary for literary analysis writing and will learn to effectively use this vocabulary to analyze a passage of literature.  I provide direct instruction in sentence structure, organization, coherence, detail, and rhetoric. [Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 11]

  • Unit 8: Heart of Darkness

    • Reading Focus

      • Students will read Heart of Darkness.  [Curriculum Requirement Scoring Component 1]

      • For each reading assignment, students will participate in various whole-class activities including discussion, debate, and critical analysis.  Individually, students will respond to readings through written analysis of rhetorical strategies and argument concerning authorial intent and purpose.  [Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 2; Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 7; Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 9]

    • Writing Focus

      • Students will begin with an introduction to the novel.  Through close reading and analysis, students will learn to connect literary techniques with an author’s purpose and the meaning of a work.  Literary prose analysis focuses on explaining how an author’s syntax, diction, imagery, tone, structure, style, theme, and figurative language work together to affect a reader.  Students will also focus on creating strong responses to literature using embedded quotes and analysis in a timed-writing situation. [Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 2; Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 3; Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 5; Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 8; Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 11; Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 12; Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 13; Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 14; Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 15]

      • Students will write an interpretation of Heart of Darkness that is based on a careful observation of textual details, considering the novel’s social, cultural and/or historical values and their effect on the novel’s theme.  This essay must consider the novel’s comments on colonialism and the prejudices present during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.  [Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 4]

      • With this writing assignment, students use peer revision techniques in groups and pairs.  Likewise, students will conference with me concerning each essay. We will discuss the student’s use of sentence structure, rhetorical structure, balance, detail, tone, and voice. All writing assignments go through the revision process before final grading. [Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 6; Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 12; Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 13; Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 14; Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 15]

    • Syntax Focus

      • Students will learn appropriate vocabulary for literary analysis writing and will learn to effectively use this vocabulary to analyze a passage of literature.  I provide direct instruction in sentence structure, organization, coherence, detail, and rhetoric. [Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 11]

  • Unit 9: Oedipus the King

    • Reading Focus

      • Students will read a variety of texts from and about Oedipus the King.  [Curriculum Requirement Scoring Component 1]

      • For each reading assignment, students will participate in various whole-class activities including discussion, debate, and critical analysis.  Individually, students will respond to readings through written analysis of rhetorical strategies and argument concerning authorial intent and purpose.  [Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 2; Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 7; Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 9]

    • Writing Focus

      • Students will begin with an introduction to the novel.  Through close reading and analysis, students will learn to connect literary techniques with an author’s purpose and the meaning of a work.  Literary prose analysis focuses on explaining how an author’s syntax, diction, imagery, tone, structure, style, theme, and figurative language work together to affect a reader.  Students will also focus on creating strong responses to literature using embedded quotes and analysis in a timed-writing situation. [Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 2; Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 3; Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 5; Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 11; Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 12; Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 13; Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 14; Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 15]

      • Students will write an essay that asks them to analyze how two key passages of dialogue in Oedipus the King highlight the play’s central theme.  Students must draw upon textual details to develop an extended interpretation of this play. [Curricluar Requirement Scoring Component 8]

      • With this writing assignment, students will use peer revision techniques in groups and pairs.  Likewise, students will conference with me concerning each essay. We will discuss the student’s use of sentence structure, rhetorical structure, balance, detail, tone, and voice. All writing assignments go through the revision process before final grading. [Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 6; Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 12; Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 13; Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 14; Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 15]

    • Syntax Focus

      • Students will learn appropriate vocabulary for literary analysis writing and will learn to effectively use this vocabulary to analyze a passage of literature.  I provide direct instruction in sentence structure, organization, coherence, detail, and rhetoric. [Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 11]

  • Unit 10: The Sound and the Fury

    • Reading Focus

      • Students will read a variety of texts from and about The Sound and the Fury.  [Curriculum Requirement Scoring Component 1]

      • For each reading assignment, students will participate in various whole-class activities including discussion, debate, and critical analysis.  Individually, students will respond to readings through written analysis of rhetorical strategies and argument concerning authorial intent and purpose.  [Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 2; Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 7; Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 9]

    • Writing Focus

      • Students will begin with an introduction to the novel.  Through close reading and analysis, students will learn to connect literary techniques with an author’s purpose and the meaning of a work.  Literary prose analysis focuses on explaining how an author’s syntax, diction, imagery, tone, structure, style, theme, and figurative language work together to affect a reader.  Students will also focus on creating strong responses to literature using embedded quotes and analysis in a timed-writing situation. [Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 2; Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 3; Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 5; Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 11; Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 12; Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 13; Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 14; Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 15]

      • Student will write an interpretive essay which considers how imagery and symbolism are used to create tone and theme within The Sound and the Fury. This essay must be based on the careful observation of textual details within the novel. [Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 2]

      • With this writing assignment, students will use peer revision techniques in groups and pairs.  Likewise, students will conference with me concerning this essay. We will discuss the student’s use of sentence structure, rhetorical structure, balance, detail, tone, and voice.  All writing assignments go through the revision process before final grading. [Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 6; Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 12; Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 13; Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 14; Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 15]

    • Syntax Focus

      • Students will learn appropriate vocabulary for literary analysis writing and will learn to effectively use this vocabulary to analyze a passage of literature.  I provide direct instruction in sentence structure, organization, coherence, detail, and rhetoric. [Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 11]

  • Unit 11: “The Final Four”

    • Reading Focus

      • Students will read passages from a variety of imaginative sources taken from past AP Exams and AP Test Preparation Workbooks.  [Curriculum Requirement Scoring Component 1]

      • For each reading assignment, students will participate in various whole-class activities including discussion, debate, and critical analysis.  Individually, students will respond to readings through written analysis of rhetorical strategies and argument concerning authorial intent and purpose.  [Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 2; Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 7; Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 9]

    • Writing Focus

      • Students will write timed essays in each of the modes represented on the AP English Literature and Composition Exam.  These modes include literary analysis, interpretation, argument, and creative writing.  [Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 5]

    • Syntax Focus

      • Students will use vocabulary for poetry analysis, prose analysis, and open-ended large work literary analysis in timed writing assignments.  Students will recognize and analyze rhetorical strategies and argumentative strategies in various texts on practice Multiple Choice test items.  I provide direct instruction in sentence structure, organization, coherence, detail, and rhetoric. [Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 11]

  1. AP Literature and Composition Exam Preparation: Multiple Choice

  • Every two weeks, students will complete a practice test representing the AP Literature and Composition Exam: Multiple Choice section.  These practice tests come from several sources:  5 Steps to a 5: AP English Literature 2012-13; Multiple Choice and Free Response Questions in Preparation for the AP English Literature and Composition Exam; and previously released AP Exam multiple choice sections.  Students take all or part of a practice test, review their scores, and review strategies to alleviate deficiencies.  [Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 1]

  • Every two weeks, students will turn in ten (10) Verbal and Visual Word Association (VVWA) Sheets using AP and SAT vocabulary words provided by the teacher.  In a VVWA, students complete four tasks: define the word using a dictionary, define the word in their own words, illustrate the word, and design some personal association or characteristic for the word.  Students then choose one (1) vocabulary word from each unit to include on our AP Word Wall where words and definitions are listed for review. [Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 11]

  • Students will take part in three (3) Saturday study sessions focusing on strategies to enhance test scores on the AP English Literature and Composition Exam.  Mock tests and simulations will be conducted at these study sessions.

  1. AP Literature and Composition Exam Preparation: Free Response

  • Within each unit, students will complete timed writings structured exactly like items on the AP English Literature and Composition Exam.  Students will begin each unit working in groups and/or pairs structuring essays and then move on to individual writing assignments. Each writing assignment will be debriefed upon completion and revised for content and structure.  For debriefing, students will work in groups and/or pairs using peer response to recognize common flaws and enhance understanding. [Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 2; Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 3; Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 4; Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 5; Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 8; Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 9; Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 10]

  • Unit 4 is designed to specifically target exam preparation.  The four weeks prior to the AP English Literature and Composition Exam will be spent in class writing essays, debriefing essays, taking multiple choice tests, and debriefing multiple choice tests.  This unit is an intense last effort to hone skills necessary for the AP Exam. [Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 2; Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 3; Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 4; Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 5; Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 8; Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 9; Curricular Requirement Scoring Component 10]