Collection Development

Collection Development
           
Collection development is the ongoing process of identifying strengths and weaknesses of library media collections in terms of student needs. Collection development demonstrates that funds are being spent wisely and that library media collections meet the informational needs of the curriculum as well as independent reading and viewing needs of students.

 

Analysis of the School Community

            In order to be responsive to the unique needs of each school, a collection development process must be based upon an analysis of student needs at that particular school. There will be some similarities among library media collections across the county, but the profile provided by this analysis will ensure that the specific needs of each school are addressed. The goal is to provide opportunities so that students may reason; think independently, critically and creatively; analyze problems and propose solutions; take responsibility; achieve personal excellence in academic skills; utilize current technology with competence; contribute to a school atmosphere conducive to learning; appreciate their community and its values; and value the role of diversity aEvaluation of the Library Media Collection

            The methods of collection evaluation can be either quantitative or qualitative.  Quantitative methods attempt to determine collection quality by using numerical data, such as the number of titles in the collection or the average collection age.  Qualitative methods attempt to measure the overall quality of the collection.  Comparison to a bibliography of recommended titles or ability to meet user needs can estimate collection quality.  Both quantitative and qualitative evaluation can be helpful in analyzing the collection.  The library management software can be used to generate these reports.
 

Selection and Acquisition of Materials
            It is the policy of each school LMC to support and enrich the instructional program of the school.  The LMC must provide a broad range of materials with a diversity of viewpoints, abilities, and interests.  The selection and acquisition of new library media materials will be based upon the needs of each library media center as determined by the collection assessment process and upon the availability of funding.

Responsibility

            The school board has the legal responsibility for the purchase of all instructional materials.  The selection and ordering of the library books, audiovisual and other materials for the LMC is the responsibility of the school LMS in consultation with the principal and in accordance with board policy.  The LMS will identify, order, and organize materials, which will implement, enrich, and support the educational program of the school district.  Teachers, supervisors, and other school personnel will give suggestions, recommendations, and other assistance.  In selecting materials the LMS, administrators, and faculty are guided by the principles incorporated in the School Library Bill of Rights, the Freedom to Read Statement, and standards adopted by the American Association of School Librarians.

 

            The collection will be developed systematically, ensuring a well-balanced coverage of subjects, opinions, and formats.  A wide range of materials on various levels of difficulty supporting the diverse interest, needs, and viewpoints of the school community is also considered.  Instructional materials are selected by the school district to implement, enrich, and support the educational program for the student. Materials must serve both the breadth of the curriculum and the needs and interests of individual students.

 

Selection

 

I.  Statement of Selection Policy Inventory

          The St. Clair County Board of Education recognizes the school media center as an integral part of the learning process.  The availability of many materials in a variety of formats presents to both students and teachers the availability to select materials that are best suited for their individual need and learning style.

 

II. Responsibility for Selection of Resources

          The selection of resources should be a decision made by many people in the school and community.  For example, administrators, teachers, students, people in the community, and media center personnel.  However, the final responsibility for coordinating the selection of resources and making the recommendation for purchase lies with the school media specialist.

 

III. Criteria for Selection of Resources

A.  The following criteria will be used as they apply:

          1.  Resources should support and be consistent with the general educational goals of the state and the district and the objectives of individual schools and specific courses.

          2.  Resources should support and enrich the curriculum and the personal needs of users.

          3.  Resources should meet high standards of quality:

·          Artistic quality and/or literary style          

·          Authenticity                   

·          Educational significance              

·          Factual content              

·          Physical format              

·          Presentation                   

·          Readability        

·          Technical quality            

·          Treatment that is clear, comprehensible, skillful, convincing, well-organized, and unbiased                 

·          Special features, such as useful illustrations, photographs, charts, maps, graphs, etc.

            4.  Resources should be appropriate for the subject area and age, emotional, development, ability level, learning style, and social development of the students for whom the resources are selected.

            5.  Resources should be designed to provide a background of information that will motivate users to examine their own attitudes and behavior, to comprehend their duties, responsibilities, rights and privileges as participating citizens in our society, and to make informed judgments in their daily lives.

            6.  Resources should provide information on opposite sides of controversial issues so that users may develop under guidance the practice of critical analysis.

B.  The selection of resources on controversial issues will be directed toward maintaining a balanced collection representing various views. Resources should explain historical and contemporary forces by presenting and analyzing tensions within a group and conflict objectively, placing an emphasis on recognizing and understanding social and economic problems. 

 

IV. Procedures for Selection of Resources

A.  Professional personnel will evaluate available resources and curriculum needs and will consult reputable, professionally prepared aids to selection and other appropriate sources.

 

          1.  Bibliographies

                  

·          H.W. Wilson’s Junior High School Catalog       

·          Library Journal              

·          H.W. Wilson’s High School Catalog      

·          Guide to Sources in Educational Media            

·          Westinghouse Learning Directory                      

·          Children and Books

               

And as part of the vertical file index, other special bibliographies, many of which have been prepared by educational organizations for particular subject areas                                               

           

            2.  Current Reviewing Media

 

·          AASA Science Books and Films              

·          Bulleting of the Center of Children’s Books       

·          Booklist               

·          Library Journal               

·          School Library Journals              

·          Kirkus Reviews

                

Other sources will be consulted as appropriate.  Whenever possible, the actual resources will be examined.

 

B.  Recommendations for purchase involved administrators, teachers, students, district personnel and people in the community, whenever appropriate.

C.  Gift materials should be judged with the same criteria and should be accepted or rejected by those criteria.

D.  Selection is an ongoing process that should include the removal of materials no longer appropriate and the replacement of lost and worn materials still of educational value.

 

V.  Fundamental Questions to Ask When Examining Resources

        1.  Is the subject matter suitable and desirable for young people?

        2.  In factual materials, is the subject matter accurate, authoritative, and up to date?

        3.  Does the subject matter interpret historical or modern life situations from a true and unbiased viewpoint?

        4.  Will the subject matter develop desirable attitudes, and appreciation in most cases?

        5.  Is the style of the material—vocabulary, sentence structure, form, diction—appropriate and effective for the subject matter and for the readers for whom it is intended?

        6.  Is the format of the material satisfactory—in appearance, size, durable binding, opaque paper, wide margins, type spacing between lines?

        7.  Are the illustrations satisfactory from the standpoint of text, of clarity, or of art value?

        8.  Is the author qualified to write in this particular field?

        9.  What is the reputation of the publisher in relation to desirable materials for school media centers?

      10.  Has the material been included in any recognized list or review of materials suitable for school media centers?

Collection Development
           
Collection development is the ongoing process of identifying strengths and weaknesses of library media collections in terms of student needs. Collection development demonstrates that funds are being spent wisely and that library media collections meet the informational needs of the curriculum as well as independent reading and viewing needs of students.

 

Analysis of the School Community
           
In order to be responsive to the unique needs of each school, a collection development process must be based upon an analysis of student needs at that particular school. There will be some similarities among library media collections across the county, but the profile provided by this analysis will ensure that the specific needs of each school are addressed. The goal is to provide opportunities so that students may reason; think independently, critically and creatively; analyze problems and propose solutions; take responsibility; achieve personal excellence in academic skills; utilize current technology with competence; contribute to a school atmosphere conducive to learning; appreciate their community and its values; and value the role of diversity and tolerance in our society.

Evaluation of the Library Media Collection
           
The methods of collection evaluation can be either quantitative or qualitative.  Quantitative methods attempt to determine collection quality by using numerical data, such as the number of titles in the collection or the average collection age.  Qualitative methods attempt to measure the overall quality of the collection.  Comparison to a bibliography of recommended titles or ability to meet user needs can estimate collection quality.  Both quantitative and qualitative evaluation can be helpful in analyzing the collection.  The library management software can be used to generate these reports.
 

Selection and Acquisition of Materials
            It is the policy of each school LMC to support and enrich the instructional program of the school.  The LMC must provide a broad range of materials with a diversity of viewpoints, abilities, and interests.  The selection and acquisition of new library media materials will be based upon the needs of each library media center as determined by the collection assessment process and upon the availability of funding.

Responsibility

            The school board has the legal responsibility for the purchase of all instructional materials.  The selection and ordering of the library books, audiovisual and other materials for the LMC is the responsibility of the school LMS in consultation with the principal and in accordance with board policy.  The LMS will identify, order, and organize materials, which will implement, enrich, and support the educational program of the school district.  Teachers, supervisors, and other school personnel will give suggestions, recommendations, and other assistance.  In selecting materials the LMS, administrators, and faculty are guided by the principles incorporated in the School Library Bill of Rights, the Freedom to Read Statement, and standards adopted by the American Association of School Librarians.

 

            The collection will be developed systematically, ensuring a well-balanced coverage of subjects, opinions, and formats.  A wide range of materials on various levels of difficulty supporting the diverse interest, needs, and viewpoints of the school community is also considered.  Instructional materials are selected by the school district to implement, enrich, and support the educational program for the student. Materials must serve both the breadth of the curriculum and the needs and interests of individual students.

 

Selection

 

I.  Statement of Selection Policy Inventory

          The St. Clair County Board of Education recognizes the school media center as an integral part of the learning process.  The availability of many materials in a variety of formats presents to both students and teachers the availability to select materials that are best suited for their individual need and learning style.

 

II. Responsibility for Selection of Resources

          The selection of resources should be a decision made by many people in the school and community.  For example, administrators, teachers, students, people in the community, and media center personnel.  However, the final responsibility for coordinating the selection of resources and making the recommendation for purchase lies with the school media specialist.

 

III. Criteria for Selection of Resources

A.  The following criteria will be used as they apply:

          1.  Resources should support and be consistent with the general educational goals of the state and the district and the objectives of individual schools and specific courses.

          2.  Resources should support and enrich the curriculum and the personal needs of users.

          3.  Resources should meet high standards of quality:

·          Artistic quality and/or literary style          

·          Authenticity                   

·          Educational significance              

·          Factual content              

·          Physical format              

·          Presentation                   

·          Readability        

·          Technical quality            

·          Treatment that is clear, comprehensible, skillful, convincing, well-organized, and unbiased                 

·          Special features, such as useful illustrations, photographs, charts, maps, graphs, etc.

            4.  Resources should be appropriate for the subject area and age, emotional, development, ability level, learning style, and social development of the students for whom the resources are selected.

            5.  Resources should be designed to provide a background of information that will motivate users to examine their own attitudes and behavior, to comprehend their duties, responsibilities, rights and privileges as participating citizens in our society, and to make informed judgments in their daily lives.

            6.  Resources should provide information on opposite sides of controversial issues so that users may develop under guidance the practice of critical analysis.

B.  The selection of resources on controversial issues will be directed toward maintaining a balanced collection representing various views. Resources should explain historical and contemporary forces by presenting and analyzing tensions within a group and conflict objectively, placing an emphasis on recognizing and understanding social and economic problems. 

 

IV. Procedures for Selection of Resources

A.  Professional personnel will evaluate available resources and curriculum needs and will consult reputable, professionally prepared aids to selection and other appropriate sources.

 

          1.  Bibliographies

                  

·          H.W. Wilson’s Junior High School Catalog       

·          Library Journal              

·          H.W. Wilson’s High School Catalog      

·          Guide to Sources in Educational Media            

·          Westinghouse Learning Directory                      

·          Children and Books

               

And as part of the vertical file index, other special bibliographies, many of which have been prepared by educational organizations for particular subject areas                                               

           

            2.  Current Reviewing Media

 

·          AASA Science Books and Films              

·          Bulleting of the Center of Children’s Books       

·          Booklist               

·          Library Journal               

·          School Library Journals              

·          Kirkus Reviews

                

Other sources will be consulted as appropriate.  Whenever possible, the actual resources will be examined.

 

B.  Recommendations for purchase involved administrators, teachers, students, district personnel and people in the community, whenever appropriate.

C.  Gift materials should be judged with the same criteria and should be accepted or rejected by those criteria.

D.  Selection is an ongoing process that should include the removal of materials no longer appropriate and the replacement of lost and worn materials still of educational value.

 

V.  Fundamental Questions to Ask When Examining Resources

        1.  Is the subject matter suitable and desirable for young people?

        2.  In factual materials, is the subject matter accurate, authoritative, and up to date?

        3.  Does the subject matter interpret historical or modern life situations from a true and unbiased viewpoint?

        4.  Will the subject matter develop desirable attitudes, and appreciation in most cases?

        5.  Is the style of the material—vocabulary, sentence structure, form, diction—appropriate and effective for the subject matter and for the readers for whom it is intended?

        6.  Is the format of the material satisfactory—in appearance, size, durable binding, opaque paper, wide margins, type spacing between lines?

        7.  Are the illustrations satisfactory from the standpoint of text, of clarity, or of art value?

        8.  Is the author qualified to write in this particular field?

        9.  What is the reputation of the publisher in relation to desirable materials for school media centers?

      10.  Has the material been included in any recognized list or review of materials suitable for school media centers?

Collection Development
           
Collection development is the ongoing process of identifying strengths and weaknesses of library media collections in terms of student needs. Collection development demonstrates that funds are being spent wisely and that library media collections meet the informational needs of the curriculum as well as independent reading and viewing needs of students.

 

Analysis of the School Community
           
In order to be responsive to the unique needs of each school, a collection development process must be based upon an analysis of student needs at that particular school. There will be some similarities among library media collections across the county, but the profile provided by this analysis will ensure that the specific needs of each school are addressed. The goal is to provide opportunities so that students may reason; think independently, critically and creatively; analyze problems and propose solutions; take responsibility; achieve personal excellence in academic skills; utilize current technology with competence; contribute to a school atmosphere conducive to learning; appreciate their community and its values; and value the role of diversity and tolerance in our society.

Evaluation of the Library Media Collection
           
The methods of collection evaluation can be either quantitative or qualitative.  Quantitative methods attempt to determine collection quality by using numerical data, such as the number of titles in the collection or the average collection age.  Qualitative methods attempt to measure the overall quality of the collection.  Comparison to a bibliography of recommended titles or ability to meet user needs can estimate collection quality.  Both quantitative and qualitative evaluation can be helpful in analyzing the collection.  The library management software can be used to generate these reports.
 

Selection and Acquisition of Materials
            It is the policy of each school LMC to support and enrich the instructional program of the school.  The LMC must provide a broad range of materials with a diversity of viewpoints, abilities, and interests.  The selection and acquisition of new library media materials will be based upon the needs of each library media center as determined by the collection assessment process and upon the availability of funding.

Responsibility

            The school board has the legal responsibility for the purchase of all instructional materials.  The selection and ordering of the library books, audiovisual and other materials for the LMC is the responsibility of the school LMS in consultation with the principal and in accordance with board policy.  The LMS will identify, order, and organize materials, which will implement, enrich, and support the educational program of the school district.  Teachers, supervisors, and other school personnel will give suggestions, recommendations, and other assistance.  In selecting materials the LMS, administrators, and faculty are guided by the principles incorporated in the School Library Bill of Rights, the Freedom to Read Statement, and standards adopted by the American Association of School Librarians.

 

            The collection will be developed systematically, ensuring a well-balanced coverage of subjects, opinions, and formats.  A wide range of materials on various levels of difficulty supporting the diverse interest, needs, and viewpoints of the school community is also considered.  Instructional materials are selected by the school district to implement, enrich, and support the educational program for the student. Materials must serve both the breadth of the curriculum and the needs and interests of individual students.

 

Selection

 

I.  Statement of Selection Policy Inventory

          The St. Clair County Board of Education recognizes the school media center as an integral part of the learning process.  The availability of many materials in a variety of formats presents to both students and teachers the availability to select materials that are best suited for their individual need and learning style.

 

II. Responsibility for Selection of Resources

          The selection of resources should be a decision made by many people in the school and community.  For example, administrators, teachers, students, people in the community, and media center personnel.  However, the final responsibility for coordinating the selection of resources and making the recommendation for purchase lies with the school media specialist.

 

III. Criteria for Selection of Resources

A.  The following criteria will be used as they apply:

          1.  Resources should support and be consistent with the general educational goals of the state and the district and the objectives of individual schools and specific courses.

          2.  Resources should support and enrich the curriculum and the personal needs of users.

          3.  Resources should meet high standards of quality:

·          Artistic quality and/or literary style          

·          Authenticity                   

·          Educational significance              

·          Factual content              

·          Physical format              

·          Presentation                   

·          Readability        

·          Technical quality            

·          Treatment that is clear, comprehensible, skillful, convincing, well-organized, and unbiased                 

·          Special features, such as useful illustrations, photographs, charts, maps, graphs, etc.

            4.  Resources should be appropriate for the subject area and age, emotional, development, ability level, learning style, and social development of the students for whom the resources are selected.

            5.  Resources should be designed to provide a background of information that will motivate users to examine their own attitudes and behavior, to comprehend their duties, responsibilities, rights and privileges as participating citizens in our society, and to make informed judgments in their daily lives.

            6.  Resources should provide information on opposite sides of controversial issues so that users may develop under guidance the practice of critical analysis.

B.  The selection of resources on controversial issues will be directed toward maintaining a balanced collection representing various views. Resources should explain historical and contemporary forces by presenting and analyzing tensions within a group and conflict objectively, placing an emphasis on recognizing and understanding social and economic problems. 

 

IV. Procedures for Selection of Resources

A.  Professional personnel will evaluate available resources and curriculum needs and will consult reputable, professionally prepared aids to selection and other appropriate sources.

 

          1.  Bibliographies

                  

·          H.W. Wilson’s Junior High School Catalog       

·          Library Journal              

·          H.W. Wilson’s High School Catalog      

·          Guide to Sources in Educational Media            

·          Westinghouse Learning Directory                      

·          Children and Books

               

And as part of the vertical file index, other special bibliographies, many of which have been prepared by educational organizations for particular subject areas                                               

           

            2.  Current Reviewing Media

 

·          AASA Science Books and Films              

·          Bulleting of the Center of Children’s Books       

·          Booklist               

·          Library Journal               

·          School Library Journals              

·          Kirkus Reviews

                

Other sources will be consulted as appropriate.  Whenever possible, the actual resources will be examined.

 

B.  Recommendations for purchase involved administrators, teachers, students, district personnel and people in the community, whenever appropriate.

C.  Gift materials should be judged with the same criteria and should be accepted or rejected by those criteria.

D.  Selection is an ongoing process that should include the removal of materials no longer appropriate and the replacement of lost and worn materials still of educational value.

 

V.  Fundamental Questions to Ask When Examining Resources

        1.  Is the subject matter suitable and desirable for young people?

        2.  In factual materials, is the subject matter accurate, authoritative, and up to date?

        3.  Does the subject matter interpret historical or modern life situations from a true and unbiased viewpoint?

        4.  Will the subject matter develop desirable attitudes, and appreciation in most cases?

        5.  Is the style of the material—vocabulary, sentence structure, form, diction—appropriate and effective for the subject matter and for the readers for whom it is intended?

        6.  Is the format of the material satisfactory—in appearance, size, durable binding, opaque paper, wide margins, type spacing between lines?

        7.  Are the illustrations satisfactory from the standpoint of text, of clarity, or of art value?

        8.  Is the author qualified to write in this particular field?

        9.  What is the reputation of the publisher in relation to desirable materials for school media centers?

      10.  Has the material been included in any recognized list or review of materials suitable for school media centers?